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Working together to improve the lives of people with brain impairment

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As our 2020 conference cannot go ahead as planned we are downsizing and going for ASSBI 2020 Conference Bite Size! 

We have planned a series of webinars on Fridays at 1pm (EST) to the end of 2020 highlighting some great papers and sessions from the 2020 Conference plus a few extra that are relevant in these uncertain times.

All the webinars will be going out live and will be available as an MP4 in our ONLINE STORE 5 days afterwards.

Please see below for dates, topic and speakers and CLICK HERE for costs, synopsis' as well as speakers bios. You can also register via this link.


ASSBI 2020 Conference Bite Size is proudly brought to you by


8am UK
9am Spain
5pm Eastern Australia, Queensland and Tasmania
3pm Western Australia
4.30pm South Australia
7pm New Zealand
CLICK HERE for other countries

August 14th –
 Prof Barbara A. Wilson: Practical help for people with memory problems following non-progressive brain injury – 60 mins

COST: $100 - non-member; $60 - member & student non-member; $40 - student member


Synopsis of sessionThis webinar examines the key components of memory rehabilitation and discusses ways in which they can be employed in clinical practice. Although restoration of memory functioning to pre-injury levels is unlikely to occur, there is a much that can be done to enable memory-impaired people and their relatives to come to terms with their difficulties and surmount a number of them by using various strategies and aids. External memory aids such as diaries, notebooks, tape recorders and mobile phones, widely used by the general population, are often problematic for memory-impaired people simply because their successful use involves memory. However, use of these aids is possible through carefully structured teaching. Internal strategies such as mnemonics and rehearsal techniques can be employed to teach new information. Errorless learning is more effective than trial-and-error learning for memory-impaired people. This is because, in order to benefit from our mistakes, we need to be able to remember them: a task which is difficult or impossible for memory-impaired people to achieve.  In addition to poor memory, many brain injured people will have other cognitive problems that need to be addressed. The emotional consequences of memory impairment such as anxiety, depression and loneliness should also be dealt with in rehabilitation through counselling, anxiety-management techniques and treatment in memory or psychotherapy groups. The webinar concludes with a structure for designing a treatment plan to reduce everyday problems for memory impaired individuals.


Outcomes: 

By the end of this webinar participants will:

 (1) have a good understanding of the principles of memory rehabilitation;

(2) be aware of the main strategies for ( a) improving learning and (b) compensating for memory deficits;  and

(3) be able to structure a treatment programme


Target Audience:  Any health care professional working in adult brain injury rehabilitation plus interested others such as students, family members and some survivors of brain injury.


Click here for more Info and to register


4am UK - available on demand
5am Spain - available on demand
11am Western Australia
12.30pm South Australia
1pm Eastern Australia, Queensland and Tasmania
3pm New Zealand
CLICK HERE for other countries

August 21st – Prof Olivier Piguet: Investigating social cognition in dementia syndromes – 60 mins

COST: $100 - non-member; $60 - member & student non-member; $40 - student member

Synopsis of session: Dementias are progressive neurodegenerative brain disorders which manifest clinically in many different forms, depending on the type, location and severity of the underlying pathology. With the ageing of the population, it is becoming urgent to ensure an early and accurate diagnosis. Clinical diagnostic criteria have been proposed in recent years, but these do not generally include social cognition despite the fact that social cognition processes are supported by many of the brain structures that undergo pathological changes in dementia.

This webinar will provide an overview of social cognition (i.e., emotion processing, understanding of social norms, empathy and theory of mind) and review the recent literature pertaining to dementia. It will also highlight how investigations of these features will improve early and accurate diagnosis and inform therapeutic interventions that can have a positive effect, not only on the individual diagnosed with the disease but also on their family members.

Level aimed for: Basic to Intermediate

Learning objectives: By the end of the webinar, attendees will: (i) have an understanding of the main aspects of social cognition, (ii) be able to identify the profiles of social cognition deficits in the main dementia syndromes, and (iii) understand their neural bases.

Click here for more Info and to register


8am UK
9am Spain
3pm Western Australia
4.30pm South Australia
5pm Eastern Australia, Queensland and Tasmania
7pm New Zealand
CLICK HERE for other countries

September 4th – Prof Barbara A. Wilson: Research for Clinicians: How to combine work with research – 60 mins

COST: $100 - non-member; $60 - member & student non-member; $40 - student member


Synopsis of sessionClinicians need to evaluate their work in order to ensure its effectiveness; and they need to be in a position to inform other members of their own and other relevant professions of progress in their work. For every patient or client we see, we should ask ourselves: “Is this patient changing and, if so, is the change due to what we are doing (or have done) or would it have happened anyway?” This workshop discusses ways in which we can make research part of our clinical work. All clinicians plan their treatment sessions and make notes afterwards. From this we can take further measure in planning, measuring, evaluating and recording our interventions so that we are in effect conducting research. We need to begin with a question, posed in such a way that it can be answered. General questions, such as:“Does medicine work or do drugs work?’ are essentially unanswerable. Instead of asking the question ‘Does rehabilitation work?’ we should ask specific questions such as “Do people learn better when prevented from making mistakes during learning?” With regard to methodology, we consider surveys, observations and experiments.We look at group designs and single case experimental designs (different from single case reports), which allow us to tease out the effects of treatment from natural recovery, extra attention or other non treatment related effects. Clinical examples are provided to illustrate good use of surveys, observations, group experiments and SCEDs.


Webinar outcomes: By the end of this webinar participants will: (1) have a good understanding of the different types of research employed in rehabilitation; (2) be aware of the use of surveys, observations and experiments to evaluate clinical effectiveness; (3) realise the importance of posing answerable questions; (4) learn about the use of group designs and single case experimental designs (SCEDs) that can be employed in clinical work.(5) know how to tease out the effects of treatment from the effects of spontaneous recovery and other non-specific factors.

Target audience:  Any health care professional working in adult brain injury rehabilitation plus interested others such as students, family members and some survivors of brain injury


Click here for more Info and to register


4am UK - available on demand
5am Spain - available on demand
11am Western Australia
12.30pm South Australia

1pm Eastern Australia, Queensland and Tasmania
3pm New Zealand

CLICK HERE for other countries


September 25th –
 Prof Beth Armstrong and Prof Juli Cofin: Improving services for Aboriginal Australians after brain injury: Current initiatives and findings to date– 60 mins


This 60 minute webinar is brought to you by Prof Beth Armstrong and Prof Juli Coffin


Cost: $100 - non-member; $60 - member & student non-member; $40 - student member


Synopsis of session: Recent research has provided insights from Aboriginal people with brain injury and their families around their journeys of recovery that involve geographical, cultural and linguistically diverse issues. One of the biggest barriers is communication, and without a culturally secure care in place, many Aboriginal Australians are simply not recovering to their full potential.   The webinar will discuss the notion of cultural security in clinical practice. We will explore the journeys of Aboriginal Australians after stroke and traumatic brain injury, highlighting ongoing challenges faced, as well as family and community resources that assist recovery, and new service initiatives aimed at improving access to rehabilitation. The presentation will also outline a program of research informed by Aboriginal people with brain injury and their families. The research involves the co-design of all new initiatives by Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal researchers, clinicians and Aboriginal community members. The presentation will provide the background to, findings to date and current initiatives to improve service delivery including the WA based Healing Right Way clinical trial – the first of its kind in brain injury involving Aboriginal people specifically.


Level aimed for: Basic to intermediate


Learning Objectives:

  1. Understanding of the concept of cultural security.
  2. Understanding of the challenges faced by Aboriginal people after brain injury as well as community resources available.
  3. Practical ways forward for the implementation of culturally secure care for Aboriginal Australians with brain injury.


Click here for more Info and to register


3am UK - available on demand
4am Spain - available on demand
10am Western Australia

12 noon Queensland

12.30pm South Australia

1pm Eastern Australia and Tasmania

3pm New Zealand
CLICK HERE for other countries


October 23rd
 – Prof Leanne Togher and Dr Rachael Rietdijk: What works for training communication partners of people with TBI? Lessons learnt from a clinical trial of the TBIconneCT program – 60 mins


This 60 minute webinar is brought to you by Prof Leanne Togher and Dr Rachael Rietdijk


Cost: $100 - non-member; $60 - member & student non-member; $40 - student member


Synopsis of session: Family members, friends, and carers often find it challenging to communicate effectively and positively with a person who has had a traumatic brain injury. Providing training to these communication partners has been found to be an effective approach. TBIconneCT is a manualised communication partner training program, suitable for delivery over telehealth, which was found to have positive outcomes in a clinical trial. This session will provide an overview of (a) the components of the TBIconneCT program, (b) the findings from the TBIconneCT trial and the clinical implications, (c) qualitative feedback from participants regarding the most important parts of the program, and (d) practical advice about working with people with TBI and their communication partners, including incorporating telehealth.


Level aimed for: Basic to Intermediate


Learning objectives: By the end of the session, attendees will: (i) be able to describe the TBIconneCT program, (ii) understand the clinical implications of the TBIconneCT trial findings, (iii) identify the aspects of the TBIconneCT training most valued by people with brain injury and their communication partners, and (iv) learn clinically applicable strategies for working for communication partners of people with TBI.


Click here for more Info and to register


2am UK - available on demand
3am Spain - available on demand

10am Western Australia

12 noon Queensland

1pm Eastern Australia and Tasmania

12.30pm South Australia

3pm New Zealand
CLICK HERE for other countries

November 27th A/Prof Libby Callaway and Prof Grahame Simpson: How to' evaluate mainstream and emerging technologies used for executive function support after brain injury – 60 mins


This 60 minute webinar is brought to you by A/Professor Libby Callaway and Professor Grahame Simpson


Cost: $100 - non-member; $60 - member & student non-member;


Session Synopsis: Emerging technologies in the 21st century offer opportunity to change the way support is delivered to people with acquired brain injury (ABI). Smart home, wearable and mobile technologies, and associated mobile applications, can offer new approaches to compensate for executive dysfunction. The growing range of technologies available hold potential to improve independent living in the community. However, tools to guide consideration and selection of technology for compensatory cognitive support are lacking. This ‘How To’ session will present a new framework for scoping and evaluating key features of technology which may be applied to compensate for executive dysfunction following ABI. Key evaluation domains will be outlined and discussed in detail. Workshop attendees will explore use of the framework via a case scenario (contributed by our team’s lived experience collaborators) to evaluate and consider features of a new movement-sensing technology that can be retrofitted into a home to offer audio-prompting support ustomized to a user’s goals and support needs. There will be an opportunity to provide structured feedback about the utility of the framework based on this applied experience.


Level aimed for: Basic to Intermediate


Learning objectives: At the end of this session, participants will have: Learnt about a new technology scoping framework developed by a research team in collaboration with people with lived experience of acquired brain injury; health professionals; researchers and social and injury insurers;Gained greater understanding of the domains of evaluation necessary when a person is exploring the use of technology for executive function support following ABI;


Been offered opportunity to test and provide feedback on use of this framework, using a case scenario contributed by lived experience collaborators;Contributed feedback which will further inform the framework design and utility.


Click here for more Info and to register

Contacts

e: admin@assbi.com.au
t: +61 (0)425 220622

PO Box 326

Matraville
NSW 2036
Australia

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Working together to improve the lives of people with brain impairment.

ASSBI is a multidisciplinary society dedicated to improving the quality of life of people with brain impairment and their families. 

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